pathogens & biofilm (10)

30 Jan 2018

Irrigation Solutions

Majsztrik, J., White, S.A. (Clemson University), and J.S. Owen, Jr. (Virginia Tech University)

Is my water clean enough or will it harm my plants? The question is simple, the answer is not. One of the most common methods of water treatment is physical screening. Typical physical filters include sand, mesh screen, disc, glass, or other substrates that serve as barriers to particulates. During physical screening, the materials in the filter serve as a barrier to stop particles (sediment) from moving through the filter.  Learn more about these filters, and how to keep your plants safe from disease and chemicals that may be spread through recycled irrigation water.

See the link bellow

http://magazine.nurserymag.com/article/august-2017/irrigation-solutions.aspx

2 Jan 2018

Successful Sanitation

Majsztrik, J. and Sarah A. White (Clemson University)

Typically, the first step in irrigation water treatment is physical removal of larger particles such as sediment, substrate material and organic matter. But rapid sand, mesh filters, etc. are not able to remove biological contaminants such plant diseases. Chemical disinfection is a safe and effective way to ensure removal of plant disease organisms from irrigation water. Chemical treatment efficacy declines if high levels of organic matter are present in water, making it necessary to increase the concentrations of chemicals needed to treat the same volume of water.  Keep reading to find out more about chemical treatment of irrigation water.

See the link bellow

http://magazine.nurserymag.com/article/october-2017/successful-sanitation.aspx

24 Oct 2017

2017 California Nursery Conference: Conclusion

Brett Cregg (Michigan State University), Paul Fisher (University of Florida), Sarah White (Clemson University), Charlie Hall (Texas A&M), and Bruno Pitton, Darren Haver, Grant Johnson, Loren Oki (University of California)

This conference, held on July 27, 2017 in Irvine, CA, focused on Water Management in Nursery and Greenhouse Production. The Clean WateRteam presented their research studies. The conclusion of the conference dealt with recycling water: economics, monitoring quality, managemet of nutrients and agrichemicals, and pathogens and biofilm. The topics covered are:

3-1ImpactsRecycledWateronPlantPhysiologyandgrowth (1175 KB)
3-2BiofilmManagement (3947 KB)
3-3BiologicalTreatmentofRunoff (4394 KB)
3-4SlowSandFilters (2204 KB)
3-5WaterRecyclingEconomics (1245 KB)

Key
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Description of research activities

A national team of scientists is working to encourage use of alternative water resources by the nation’s billion-dollar nursery and floriculture industry has been awarded funds for the first year of an $8.7 million, five year US Department of Agriculture – National Institute of Food and Agriculture –Specialty Crop Research Initiative competitive grant.

The team will develop and apply systems-based solutions to assist grower decision making by providing science-based information to increase use of recycled water.  This award from the NIFA’s Specialty Crop Research Initiative is managed by Project Director Sarah White of Clemson University.  She leads a group of 21 scientists from nine U.S. institutions.

Entitled “Clean WateR3 - Reduce, Remediate, Recycle – Enhancing Alternative Water Resources Availability and Use to Increase Profitability in Specialty Crops”, the Clean WateR3 team will assist the grower decision-making process by providing science-based information on nutrient, pathogen, and pesticide fate in recycled water both before and after treatment, average cost and return-on investment of technologies examined, and model-derived, site specific recommendations for water management.  The trans-disciplinary Clean WateR3 team will develop these systems-based solutions by integrating sociological, economic, modeling, and biological data into a user-friendly decision-support system intended to inform and direct our stakeholders’ water management decision-making process.

The Clean WateR3 grant team is working with a stakeholder group of greenhouse and nursery growers throughout the United States.

For example, at the University of Florida graduate student George Grant is collecting data on removal of paclobutrazol, a highly persistent plant growth regulator chemical, from recirculated water using granular activated carbon (GAC) filters. This is being done in both research greenhouses and in a commercial site. The GAC filters can remove more than 90% of chemical residues, and are proving to be a cost-effective treatment method.

 

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